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I have yet to talk to a developer that has told me that they were purposefully writing bad . I think this is something that is part of being a developer, that you write that is as good as you can possibly make it within the constraints that you have.

In our effort to write the Best Software Ever (TM) we read up on all the programming best : design patterns, refactoring and rewriting code, new concepts such as Domain-Driven Design and CQRS, all the latest frameworks and of course we test our code until we have a decent code coverage and we sit together with our teammates to do pair programming. And that’s great. It is. But it isn’t.

In my lightning talk for the PHPAmersfoort meetup on Tuesday, January 9th, , I ranted a bit about best practices. In this blog post, I try to summarize what I ranted about.

Test Coverage

Test coverage is great! It is a great tool to measure how much of our code is being touched by unit (and possibly integration) tests. A lot of developers I talk to tell me that they strive to get 0% code coverage, 80% code coverage, 50% code coverage or any other arbitrary percentage. What they don’t mention is whether or not they actually look at what they are testing.

Over the years I have encountered so many unit tests that were not actually testing anything. They were written for a sole purpose: To make sure that all the lines in the code were “green”, were covered by unit tests. And that is useless. Completely useless. You get a false sense of if you work like this.

There are many ways of keeping track of whether your tests actually make sense. Recently I wrote about using docblocks for that purpose, but you can also use code coverage to help you write great tests. Generating code coverage can help you identify which parts of your code are not covered by tests. But instead of just writing a test to ensure the line turns green, you need to consider what that line of code stands for, what behavior it adds to your code. And you should write your tests to test that behavior, not just to add a green line and an extra 0.1% to your code coverage. Code coverage is an indication, not a proof of good tests.

Domain-driven design

DDD is a way of designing the code of your application based on the domain you’re working in. It puts the actual use cases at the heart of your application and ensures that your code is structured in a way that makes sense to the context it is running in.

Domain-Driven Design is a big hit in the programming world at the moment. These days you don’t count anymore if you don’t do DDD. And you shouldn’t just know about DDD or try to apply it here and there, no: ALL YOUR CODES SHOULD BE DDD!1!1shift-one!!1!

Now, don’t get me wrong: There is a lot in DDD that makes way more sense than any approach I’ve used in the past, but just applying DDD on every bit of code you write does not make any sense. Doing things DDD is not that hard, but doing DDD right takes a lot of learning and a lot of effort. And for quite a few of the things that I’ve seen people want to use full-on DDD recently, I wonder whether it is worth the effort.

So yes, dig into DDD, read the blue book if you want, read any book about it, all the blog post, and apply it where it makes sense. Go ahead! But don’t overdo it.

Frameworks

I used to be a framework zealot. I was convinced that everyone should use frameworks, and everyone should use it all the . For me it started with Mojavi, then Zend Framework and finally I settled on Symfony. To me, the approach and structure that Symfony gave me made so much sense that I started using Symfony for every project that I worked on. My first step would be to download (and later: install) Symfony. It made my life so much easier.

Using a framework does make a lot of sense for a lot of situations. And I personally do not really care what framework you use, although I see a lot of people saying “You use Laravel? You’re such a n00b!” or “No, you have to use Symfony for everything” or “Zend Framework is the only true enterprise framework and you need to use it”.

First of all: There is no single framework that is good for every situation. Second of all, why use a pre-fab framework when you can build your own?. And sometimes you really don’t need a framework. Stop bashing o

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